Tag Archives: Antimatter

Understanding the Mystery of Matter in the Universe – Why Is There Any Matter in the Universe at All?

by University of Sussex, SciTechDaily

Scientists one step closer to understanding the mystery of matter in the universe.

Scientists at the University of Sussex have measured a property of the neutron – a fundamental particle in the universe — more precisely than ever before. Their research is part of an investigation into why there is matter left over in the universe, that is, why all the antimatter created in the Big Bang didn’t just cancel out the matter.

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Explaining a universe composed of matter

by Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Phys.org

The universe consists of a massive imbalance between matter and antimatter. Antimatter and matter are actually the same, but have opposite charges, but there’s hardly any antimatter in the observable universe, including the stars and other galaxies. In theory, there should be large amounts of antimatter, but the observable universe is mostly matter.

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Spectrum of Antimatter Observed for First Time

by Matt Williams, Universe Today

Ever since the existence of antimatter was proposed in the early 20th century, scientists have sought to understand how relates to normal matter, and why there is an apparent imbalance between the two in the Universe. To do this, particle physics research in the past few decades has focused on the anti-particle of the most elementary and abundant atom in the Universe – the antihydrogen particle. Continue reading Spectrum of Antimatter Observed for First Time