Tag Archives: MIT

MIT scientists made a shape-shifting material that morphs into a human face

by Jennifer Ouellette, ARSTechnica

New method based on double-curvature effect described by Gauss nearly 200 years ago.

The next big thing in 3D printing just might be so-called “4D materials” that employ the same manufacturing technique but are designed to deform over time in response to changes in the environment, like humidity and temperature. They’re also sometimes known as active origami or shape-morphing systems. MIT scientists successfully created flat structures that can transform into much more complicated structures than had previously been achieved, including a human face. They published their results last fall in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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What Exactly Makes One Knot Better Than Another Has Not Been Well-Understood – Until Now

by Jennifer Chu (Mass. Institute of Technology), SciTechDaily

How Strong Is Your Knot?

With help from spaghetti and color-changing fibers, a new mathematical model predicts a knot’s stability.

In sailing, rock climbing, construction, and any activity requiring the securing of ropes, certain knots are known to be stronger than others. Any seasoned sailor knows, for instance, that one type of knot will secure a sheet to a headsail, while another is better for hitching a boat to a piling. 

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System provides cooling with no electricity

by David Chandler, MIT News

Passive device relies on a layer of material that blocks incoming sunlight but lets heat radiate away.

Imagine a device that can sit outside under blazing sunlight on a clear day, and without using any power cool things down by more than 23 degrees Fahrenheit (13 degrees Celsius). It almost sounds like magic, but a new system designed by researchers at MIT and in Chile can do exactly that.

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MIT scientists accidentally create the blackest material ever

by Rachel England, engadget

It absorbs 99.995 percent of light.

Good news for goths — black somehow just got even blacker. MIT engineers have cooked up a material that’s 10 times blacker than anything else previously reported. Capturing more than 99.995 percent of any incoming light, the material is made of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) grown on chlorine-etched aluminium foil. And it was discovered by accident.

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