Tag Archives: Human Brain

Stanford scientists uncover how a fluctuating brain network may make us better thinkers

by Taylor Kubota, Stanford News

Communication between different areas of our brain increases when we are faced with a difficult task. Understanding these fluctuating patterns could reveal why some people learn new tasks more quickly.

For the past 100 years, scientists have understood that different areas of the brain serve unique purposes. Only recently have they realized that the organization isn’t static. Rather than having strictly defined routes of communication between different areas, the level of coordination between different parts of the brain seems to ebb and flow. Continue reading Stanford scientists uncover how a fluctuating brain network may make us better thinkers

Scientists Hook Up Brain to Tablet – Paralyzed Woman Googles With Ease

by Shelly Fan, Singularity Hub

For patient T6, 2014 was a happy year.

That was the year she learned to control a Nexus tablet with her brain waves, and literally took her life quality from 1980s DOS to modern era Android OS.

A brunette lady in her early 50s, patient T6 suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease), which causes progressive motor neuron damage. Continue reading Scientists Hook Up Brain to Tablet – Paralyzed Woman Googles With Ease

How Conscious Are You?

by Yuen Yiu, Inside Science

Scientists use physical models to quantify human consciousness.

What is consciousness? For centuries, philosophers, scientists, and writers have pondered the question. The concept or even the word itself is difficult to define, and because of this it is one of the most difficult subjects to study scientifically.

One of the most common interpretations of consciousness is awareness or alertness, but even this is closely intertwined with other facets of consciousness such as self-awareness. Continue reading How Conscious Are You?

MIT makes Neural Nets show their work

by Andrew Tarantola, Engadget

Computers can now provide both results and their reasoning behind them.

Turns out, the inner workings of neural networks really aren’t any easier to understand than those of the human brain. But thanks to research coming out of MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL), that could soon change. Continue reading MIT makes Neural Nets show their work