Tag Archives: Drones

Cardboard delivery drone has a one-way ticket

by Nick Lavars, New Atlas

Once the goods have arrived, the drones biodegrade in a matter of days

In developing regions where lack of road infrastructure is problematic for those in the business of moving goods, drones are already having an impact. But also problematic is the fact that the people sending drones off to do the courier work kinda need them back again. A new cardboard drone being funded by DARPA won’t concern itself with such limitations, with the ability to deliver vital goods and disappear soon after the job is done.

Back in 2015 we learned of a typically futuristic DARPA program called ICARUS, which stands for Inbound, Controlled, Air-Releasable, Unrecoverable Systems. As the title suggests, the name of the game is to develop small, single-use aircraft that can be deployed from larger aircraft, carry supplies to isolated locations and evaporate thereafter.

Continue reading Cardboard delivery drone has a one-way ticket

Awesome new ‘drone in a box’ system can launch, land, and recharge itself autonomously

by Luke Dormehl, Digital Trends

A bit like a twenty-first century “jack in the box,” a bold new all-in-one drone solution takes the form of a box, which opens up to act as a launch pad for a drone, capable of carrying out autonomous missions, before returning to its home to have its batteries automatically swapped out.

It’s the product of excellently-named startup Airmada, and promises to take the current meaning of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to the next level. Continue reading Awesome new ‘drone in a box’ system can launch, land, and recharge itself autonomously

The Pentagon’s Autonomous Swarming Drones Are the Most Unsettling Thing You’ll See Today

by Kyle Mizokami, Popular Mechanics

Ejected from a fighter, the tiny drones collaborate to accomplish their mission—with not a single human involved

An arm of the Pentagon charged with fielding critical new technologies has developed a drone that not only carries out its mission without human piloting, but can talk to other drones to collaborate on getting the job done. The Perdix autonomous drone operates in cooperative swarms of 20 or more, working together towards a single goal. Continue reading The Pentagon’s Autonomous Swarming Drones Are the Most Unsettling Thing You’ll See Today

Six new technologies that will enable faster, better internet to the world

by Cat DiStasio, Engadget

Airborne drones may soon provide connectivity to remote areas

The internet is one of the most important inventions of the modern era. However, current estimates say that only 40 percent of people around the globe have access. As internet connectivity becomes ever more important, new technologies are emerging to connect the entire globe with better, faster service. Continue reading Six new technologies that will enable faster, better internet to the world

Six drones that do good for people and the planet

by Inhabitat, Engadget

They watch for animal poachers and deliver emergency medicine and supplies

When the general public first learned about drones, the context was largely related to military applications and spy tactics, so the unmanned aircraft were cast with a bad rap. Years later, a number of creative technologists have found ways to use drones to help people, animals, and the environment. Continue reading Six drones that do good for people and the planet

Attack on the drones: the creeping privatization of our urban airspace

by Bradley L Garrett and Adam Fish, The Guardian

Who owns the air above our cities? The public and the media are in danger of losing access to a valuable common resource, with corporations given priority

We woke up before dawn and caught the first train to Waterloo, so we could capture some aerial footage in the early morning London light with no one around. We were interested in using a drone to get a vantage point that no rooftop could offer, looking down on the under-renovation South Bank Tower.

Lifting off from a grassy, flat expanse next to the river Thames, we quickly vaulted to the height of a 30-storey building and began capturing slow, sweeping images from a bird’s-eye view. But then a security guard emerged from the building and ran towards us. “You can’t fly that here,” he yelled. Continue reading Attack on the drones: the creeping privatization of our urban airspace

Forget Drones – Google Explores Robot Delivery

by Will Knight, MIT Technology Review

Legged robots from Boston Dynamics can navigate a home, and even deliver a parcel, using advances in manipulation and vision.

The nimble-legged robots under development at a secretive Google subsidiary are getting ever more capable and clever.

At a conference in Barcelona this week, Marc Raibert, the CEO of Boston Dynamics, which specializes in dynamically balancing legged machines, demonstrated some of the progress his researchers have been making. Continue reading Forget Drones – Google Explores Robot Delivery

Drone racing: This is one of the fastest growing sports in the world and will be coming to a TV near you soon

by Ben Kiely, Sports Joe

Imagine flying through the sky at high speeds with a full view of your surroundings with no fear of getting hurt if you wipe out.

We’re living in a world where you don’t have to imagine such an exhilarating experience, thanks to the wonderful new sport that’s sweeping the globe known as drone racing. Thank you science!

Drone racing is exactly what it sounds like it is, only better. Pilots build and fly extremely fast and agile multi-rotor robots around a set course as fast as they possibly can. The kicker, and this is what makes it even more exciting, is that almost all drone racing is done using an FPV (First Person View) experience so it feels like the pilot controlling the drone is actually flying. Continue reading Drone racing: This is one of the fastest growing sports in the world and will be coming to a TV near you soon

The Pentagon’s ‘Terminator Conundrum’: Robots That Could Kill on Their Own

by Matthew Rosenberg and John Markoff, The New York Times

The United States has put artificial intelligence at the center of its defense strategy, with weapons that can identify targets and make decisions.

The small drone, with its six whirring rotors, swept past the replica of a Middle Eastern village and closed in on a mosque-like structure, its camera scanning for targets.

No humans were remotely piloting the drone, which was nothing more than a machine that could be bought on Amazon. But armed with advanced artificial intelligence software, it had been transformed into a robot that could find and identify the half-dozen men carrying replicas of AK-47s around the village and pretending to be insurgents.

As the drone descended slightly, a purple rectangle flickered on a video feed that was being relayed to engineers monitoring the test. The drone had locked onto a man obscured in the shadows, a display of hunting prowess that offered an eerie preview of how the Pentagon plans to transform warfare. Continue reading The Pentagon’s ‘Terminator Conundrum’: Robots That Could Kill on Their Own