These Fake Fingerprint Stickers Let You Access a Protected Phone While Wearing Gloves

by Andrew Liszewski, GIZMODO

Gloves that work on touchscreen devices are nothing new—they’ve existed almost as long as smartphones have. But gloves that can unlock a mobile device that’s protected with a fingerprint reader? It might be a solution to a first world problem, but it’s a problem we’re happy is solved. Continue reading These Fake Fingerprint Stickers Let You Access a Protected Phone While Wearing Gloves

Software Dreams Up New Molecules in Quest for Wonder Drugs

by Tom Simonite, MIT Technology Review

Ingesting a heap of drug data allows a machine-learning system to suggest alternatives humans hadn’t tried yet.

What do you get if you cross aspirin with ibuprofen? Harvard chemistry professor Alán Aspuru-Guzik isn’t sure, but he’s trained software that could give him an answer by suggesting a molecular structure that combines properties of both drugs. Continue reading Software Dreams Up New Molecules in Quest for Wonder Drugs

Stanford scientists uncover how a fluctuating brain network may make us better thinkers

by Taylor Kubota, Stanford News

Communication between different areas of our brain increases when we are faced with a difficult task. Understanding these fluctuating patterns could reveal why some people learn new tasks more quickly.

For the past 100 years, scientists have understood that different areas of the brain serve unique purposes. Only recently have they realized that the organization isn’t static. Rather than having strictly defined routes of communication between different areas, the level of coordination between different parts of the brain seems to ebb and flow. Continue reading Stanford scientists uncover how a fluctuating brain network may make us better thinkers

Reboot Your Brain? Science Says It’s Possible

by Rebecca Sato, The Daily Galaxy

Contrary to popular belief, recent studies have found that there are probably ways to regenerate brain matter.

Animal studies conducted at the National Institute on Aging Gerontology Research Center and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, for example, have shown that both calorie restriction and intermittent fasting along with vitamin and mineral intake, increase resistance to disease, extend lifespan, and stimulate production of neurons from stem cells.

Continue reading Reboot Your Brain? Science Says It’s Possible

This 1000-Ton Turbine Will Harvest Tidal Energy to Power 500 Homes in Canada

by Kate Lunau, MotherBoard

The Bay of Fundy, on Canada’s East Coast, has famously strong tides. An incoming tide can pull 160 billion tonnes of seawater into the bay, with a vertical range of over 16 metres, and swift tidal currents. It has the highest recorded tides in the world.

For a long time, green energy advocates have wanted to harness that powerful tide to produce energy, and now it’s happening. Continue reading This 1000-Ton Turbine Will Harvest Tidal Energy to Power 500 Homes in Canada

Robots Will Take Two-Thirds of All Jobs In the Developing World, UN Says

by Jordan Pearson, MotherBoard

It’s a common belief that low-wage workers will be hit the hardest by advanced robots in the workplace. When we take a global perspective on this, the people that will be most affected by widespread automation won’t be workers in North America, according to a new United Nations report—it’ll be people in developing countries. Continue reading Robots Will Take Two-Thirds of All Jobs In the Developing World, UN Says

Google’s mini radar can identify virtually any object

by Jon Fingas, Engadget

Project Soli just needs to get close to an item to determine what it is.

Google’s Project Soli radar technology is useful for much more than controlling your smartwatch with gestures. University of St. Andrews scientists have used the Soli developer kit to create RadarCat, a device that identifies many kinds of objects just by getting close enough. Thanks to machine learning, it can not only identify different materials, such as air or steel, but specific items. It’ll know if it’s touching an apple or an orange, an empty glass versus one full of water, or individual body parts.

Continue reading Google’s mini radar can identify virtually any object

5 Big Tech Trends That Will Make This Election Look Tame

by Peter Diamandis, SingularityHub

If you think this election is insane, wait until 2020.

I want you to imagine how, in four years’ time, technologies like AI, machine learning, sensors and networks will accelerate.

Political campaigns are about to get hyper-personalized thanks to advances in a few exponential technologies. Continue reading 5 Big Tech Trends That Will Make This Election Look Tame

Drone racing: This is one of the fastest growing sports in the world and will be coming to a TV near you soon

by Ben Kiely, Sports Joe

Imagine flying through the sky at high speeds with a full view of your surroundings with no fear of getting hurt if you wipe out.

We’re living in a world where you don’t have to imagine such an exhilarating experience, thanks to the wonderful new sport that’s sweeping the globe known as drone racing. Thank you science!

Drone racing is exactly what it sounds like it is, only better. Pilots build and fly extremely fast and agile multi-rotor robots around a set course as fast as they possibly can. The kicker, and this is what makes it even more exciting, is that almost all drone racing is done using an FPV (First Person View) experience so it feels like the pilot controlling the drone is actually flying. Continue reading Drone racing: This is one of the fastest growing sports in the world and will be coming to a TV near you soon

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