Microsoft confirms plan to rebuild Edge browser using Chromium on Windows 10

by Zac Bowden, Windows Central

Edge UWP is no more, as Microsoft commits to rebuilding it from the ground up as a desktop app, this time powered by Chromium

Microsoft today confirmed plans to rebuild its Edge browser using Chromium, in a move designed to improve web performance and app availability across platforms. Windows Central reported earlier about the shift in strategy and now it is official.

Continue reading Microsoft confirms plan to rebuild Edge browser using Chromium on Windows 10

If Earth’s orbit is so crowded, why don’t we see space junk in photos of the Earth?

by Mary Beth Griggs, Popular Science

IT’S A MATTER OF PERSPECTIVE

Sometimes, when we post a cool picture of the Earth taken from space, Popular Science gets questions about why, if there’s so much garbage in space, we don’t see an orbital landfill circling our planet in pictures of the Earth. Continue reading If Earth’s orbit is so crowded, why don’t we see space junk in photos of the Earth?

NASA thinks the first alien life we discover is going to look nothing like what most people expect

by Keegan Larwin and Jessica Orwig, Business Insider

When we think of our first contact with alien life, many people imagine a small green humanoid in a flying saucer. The reality will be much different. NASA’s Chief Scientist, Ellen Stofan, explains what we should expect when we do discover extraterrestrial life.

Watch the video here…

Scientists discovered something ‘shocking’ that could rewrite a key part of human evolution

by Gene Kim and Jessica Orwig, Business Insider

Human hands are capable of performing incredibly complex movements like no other parts of the body. But it’s been a long-term mystery of how they evolved into their current form. A group of researchers — Tetsuya Nakamura, Andrew R. Gehrke, Justin Lemberg, Julie Szymaszek, and Neil H. Shubin — unveiled a new study that shows evidence of where human hands might have come from.

Watch the video here…

In not-too-distant future, brain hackers could steal your deepest secrets

by Dan Goodin, ars TECHNICA

Religious beliefs, political leanings, and medical conditions are up for grabs

In the beginning, people hacked phones. In the decades to follow, hackers turned to computers, smartphones, Internet-connected security cameras, and other so-called Internet of things devices. The next frontier may be your brain, which is a lot easier to hack than most people think. Continue reading In not-too-distant future, brain hackers could steal your deepest secrets

A new material to unearth mysteries of magnetic fields

by William Weir, PHYS.ORG

Journeying to the center of the Earth, a la Jules Verne, won’t be happening anytime soon. A new material made from a liquid metal and magnetic particles, however, could make it much easier for researchers to recreate the powerful forces at the planet’s core. Continue reading A new material to unearth mysteries of magnetic fields

The Milky Way is 392 decillion times more massive than the heaviest thing we’ve ever weighed

by Derrick Rossignol, Nerdist

The universe is so unfathomably huge that our tiny human brains can barely imagine just how big it really is out there. Case in point, a paper recently published in the Astrophysics Journal estimates that the mass of the Milky Way galaxy is 9.5 x 10^41 kilograms — 4.8 x 10^11 times the mass of the sun. That sounds wild, but can those impossibly gigantic numbers mean anything to us? Continue reading The Milky Way is 392 decillion times more massive than the heaviest thing we’ve ever weighed

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