Majungasaurus, one of the last Dinosaurs to walk Earth, replaced its teeth as fast as Sharks

Majungasaurus, one of the last Dinosaurs to walk Earth, replaced its teeth as fast as Sharks

by Hannah Osborne, Newsweek Tech & Science

A meat-eating dinosaur that was one of the last to walk Earth replaced its teeth as often as modern sharks do, scientists have discovered. Majungasaurus, which lived between 66 and 70 million years ago, was found to grow new teeth about once every two months. That is up to 13 times faster than some other carnivorous dinosaurs, such as Tyrannosaurus Rex, which took about two years to grow new teeth.

In a study published in PLOS One, researchers led by Michael D. D’Emic, from Adelphi University in New York, analyzed the tooth replacement patterns in three species of carnivorous dinosaurs—Allosaurus, Ceratosaurus and Majungasaurus. Allosaurus lived between 145 to 155 million years ago, Ceratosaurus lived between 145 and 161 million years ago, while Majungasaurus emerged far later, from 66 to 70 million years ago—the point when dinosaurs went extinct.

Previous research has shown dinosaurs replaced their teeth, with different species doing so at different rates. Before this research, it was thought herbivores replaced their teeth every few weeks or months, while carnivores did so at a slower rate, taking months—if not years—to do so. However, this was based on the study of just 17 species, only three of which were carnivorous. “We show in this new study that some carnivores replaced their teeth on par with rates seen in herbivores, which was surprising,” D’Emic told Newsweek.

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