Explaining a universe composed of matter

Explaining a universe composed of matter

by Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Phys.org

The universe consists of a massive imbalance between matter and antimatter. Antimatter and matter are actually the same, but have opposite charges, but there’s hardly any antimatter in the observable universe, including the stars and other galaxies. In theory, there should be large amounts of antimatter, but the observable universe is mostly matter.

“We’re here because there’s more matter than antimatter in the universe,” says Professor Jens Oluf Andersen at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology’s (NTNU)Department of Physics. This great imbalance between matter and antimatter is all tangible matter, including life forms, exists, but scientists don’t understand why.

Physics uses a standard model to explain and understand how the world is connected. The standard model is a theory that describes all the particles scientists are familiar with. It accounts for quarks, electrons, the Higgs boson particle and how they all interact with each other. But the standard model cannot explain the fact that the world consists almost exclusively of matter. So there must be something we don’t yet understand.

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