9,900-Year-Old Skeleton Discovered in Submerged Mexican Cave Has a Distinctive Skull

9,900-Year-Old Skeleton Discovered in Submerged Mexican Cave Has a Distinctive Skull

by PLOS, SciTechDaily

‘Chan Hol 3,’ like other Tulum cave skeletons, has tooth cavities and a distinctive skull compared to other early American settlers.

A new skeleton discovered in the submerged caves at Tulum sheds new light on the earliest settlers of Mexico, according to a study published February 5, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Wolfgang Stinnesbeck from Universität Heidelberg, Germany.

Humans have been living in Mexico’s Yucatán Peninsula since at least the Late Pleistocene (126,000-11,700 years ago). Much of what we know about these earliest settlers of Mexico comes from nine well-preserved human skeletons found in the submerged caves and sinkholes near Tulum in Quintana Roo, Mexico.

Here, Stinnesbeck and colleagues describe a new, 30 percent-complete skeleton, ‘Chan Hol 3’, found in the Chan Hol underwater cave within the Tulum cave system. The authors used a non-damaging dating method and took craniometric measurements, then compared her skull to 452 skulls from across North, Central, and South America as well as other skulls found in the Tulum caves.

Read the full article here…

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